STUDIO CITY, CALIFORNIA - JUNE 12: Actor Cary Elwes visits 'The IMDb Show' on June 12, 2019 in Studio City, California. This episode of 'The IMDb Show' airs on July 11, 2019. (Photo by Rich Polk/Getty Images for IMDb)

It’s inconceivable!! NBC News says Princess Bride star Cary Elwes had to be airlifted to safety recently after being bitten by a rattlesnake while doing yardwork. Elwes is known for playing Wesley in “The Princess Bride”, as well as Dr. Lawrence Gordon in the “Saw” movie series.

Elwes showed the deadly bite on his finger via social media and said in the caption, “bit not by an ROUS but a rattlesnake.” Remember what a ROUS is? A Rodent of Unusual Size. LOL! At least he seems to be handling the situation well.

Warning: Cary Elwes’s post might make you cringe a bit so prepare yourself. Not too bloody or anything, but very swollen and bruised!

The actor was airlifted to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center and the bite was so severe it required immediate attention. But, NBC reports Cary is expected to make a full recovery. He captioned his post, “Grateful to the staff of Malibu Urgent Care, LA County Fire Dept. and the staff and medical professionals at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center for their great care. Am recovering well thanks to all these wonderful folks.”

What’s your favorite movie that stars Cary Elwes? Have you ever been bitten by a snake?

Source: NBC News

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North Carolina has Six Venomous Snakes On Our Ultimate Snake List

  • Cottonmouth: Venomous Snake in North Carolina

    Every year I see probably about ten of these lovely creatures. They make me jump out of my skin. This venomous snake is also called Water Moccasin. This is the most common venomous snake out of the six. It is found literally everywhere throughout North Carolina. The bites for these bad boys are he bites are pretty painful, but deaths from copperhead bites are extremely rare. You can see more on this snake here.

    Cotton Mouth Snake

  • The Longest Snake in the World

    This is a worthwhile one if you like snakes. The average length of a reticulated python is 20 feet. That’s the length of two basketball hoops! These snakes are found in southeast Asia. The habitat preferences of these animals appear to depend on their location, but they enjoy rainforests, woodlands, and grasslands. You can see more on this snake here.

    Reticulated Python

  • Eastern Coral Snake: Venomous Snake in North Carolina

    Though I love the colors, I wouldn’t get close to them! The Eastern Coral Snake is often referred to as the candy stick snake. It is normally the most misidentified snake found in North Carolina. In the southern Coastal Plain from North Carolina to Louisiana, including Florida, the eastern coral snake is scattered. Throughout their range, they can be found grazing in areas of scrub oak sandhills and pine Flatwoods that flood seasonally. You can’t legally kill the Eastern Coral Snake due to their endangered status. You can see more on this snake here.

    Eastern Coral Snake

  • Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake: Venomous Snake in North Carolina

    Just seeing photos of this snake gives me nightmares. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake is the largest and perhaps the most dangerous species of rattlesnake in the world. The backs of these heavy-bodied pitvipers are covered with black diamond patterns outlined in dark diamonds. In North Carolina, diamondbacks are usually found in sandy pine Flatwoods in the southeastern Coastal Plain. You can’t legally kill the Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake due to their endangered status. You can see more on this snake here.

    Eastern Diamond Back Rattlesnake

  • The Heaviest Snake in the World

    Wow! The heaviest snake in the world is the green anaconda. They can reach up to 220 pounds and 16 feet in length. A native of South America, the green anaconda inhabits swamps, marshes, and streams. These snakes are nonvenomous. You can see more on this snake here.

    Green Anaconda

  • Copperhead: Venomous Snake in North Carolina

    Do you often see these? I sure do. Most North Carolinians know at least the name of the copperhead. Copperheads are typically between two and three feet long, with a fairly heavy body. North Carolina is home to the most common and widespread venomous snake, the copperhead. You can see more on this snake here.

    Copperhead Snake

  • Pigmy Rattlesnake: Venomous Snake in North Carolina

    They’re kind of cute, aren’t they? Pigmy Rattlesnakes are also venomous snakes in North Carolina. In the United States, pigmy rattlesnakes are the smallest species of rattlesnake. Snakes that live in this region usually have dull gray bodies with a row of dark spots running down the center of their backs. In North Carolina, pigmy rattlers are found in pine Flatwoods and scrub oak habitats in the southeastern Coastal Plain and the Sandhills. They have been found at Crowder’s Mountain State Park in Gaston County. You can see more on this snake here.

    Pigmy Rattlesnake

  • Timber Rattlesnake: Venomous Snake in North Carolina

    Rattlesnakes of this species are large and heavy-bodied, with dark bands or chevrons protruding from their bodies. They are most commonly found in mountains and coastal plains. One of the most impressive things about this snake is the fact that it can strike up to 1/3 to 1/2 of its body length. I am not a fan of this snake. You can see more on this snake here.

    Timber Rattlesnake

  • What to Do When You Get A Snake Bite?

    If you are bitten by a snake, follow these directions given by the Carolinas Poison Center:

    • Stay calm. Call 911 or Carolinas Poison Center at 1-800-848-6946.
    • Try to identify the snake by sight only. Look for color, markings, and head shape.
    • Do not try to kill the snake; it could bite again.
    • Keep the patient calm and immobile (preferably lying down).
    • Keep the affected limb at an even level with the rest of the body.
    • Do not use a tourniquet.
    • Do not cut the wound.
    • Do not try to suck out the venom.
    • Do not pack the wound in ice.