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LAS CRUCES, NM - MAY 17: A U.S. map is displayed with pins marking locations where asylum seekers will travel to meet their sponsors, in a shelter for migrants who are seeking asylum, on May 17, 2019 in Las Cruces, New Mexico. After being released by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to the shelter, asylum-seekers are normally transferred from the shelter to their U.S. sponsors around the country as they await their asylum requests. Approximately 1,000 migrants per day are being released by authorities in the El Paso sector of the U.S.-Mexico border, which includes Las Cruces. Las Cruces has processed over 5,000 asylum seekers since it began receiving them from the Border Patrol on April 12. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Spelling is a big issue for a lot of people, and it turns out during the past year or so there were certain words a lot of people had trouble spelling correctly.

Here’s the formula. AT&T used Google Trends to uncover the most commonly misspelled words from March 24, 2020, to March 24, 2021, when much of the country was in lockdown.  It turns out the word most people had trouble with was “Quarantine,” with many spelling it “Corn Teen.”

The research looked at the top word folks look up when searching “how to spell.” Quarantine was the most popular in 12 states.  Colorado, Connecticut, Indiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, Oregon, Tennessee, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Glad to see NC and SC survived out of the top 10!

The next most commonly misspelled word was “favorite,” with seven states having trouble with it, and the most common misspelling being favourite.” Other common misspelled words include “coronavirus,” a problem for six states, “which,” an issue for five, and “every,” “believe” and “definitely,” a problem for three each.

We mentioned on the air; last year we got an email telling us to spell “coronavirus” correctly. Apparently it’s not spelled “caronovirus”

haha

Find out your state’s most commonly misspelled word here.

Source: USA Today