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Isn’t it frustrating when you initially have trouble just falling asleep…but then to wake up in the middle of the night and can’t fall back asleep? Yeah, not getting a good night’s sleep is probably of the worse things EVER. Especially if it’s a consistent thing. There are many different reasons why you could possibly be losing sleep. You might think it’s stress, hormones, lack of exercise, or something else. But have you considered your diet yet?

The website Mind Body Green consulted with registered dietician Julie Stefanski, M.ed., RDN about the foods you should avoid to have a better chance of getting a good night’s sleep…and without waking up!

According to Stefanski, there are 6 major foods or types of food you should avoid and they’re listed below. But don’t worry! If after you read this list, you’re thinking, “hmm, yeah, but what foods can I actually eat before bed?” Obviously, we’ve all done some midnight snacking here and there before. Stefanski also gives some healthy and beneficial suggestions for that too. One major theme with midnight snacks: eat something high in magnesium, like the examples at the bottom of the list.

Do you think the way you eat disrupts your sleep? What do you like to snack on before bed?

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  • Spicy Foods

    Hot Sauce

    CHICAGO, IL – DECEMBER 12: Bottles of Sriracha hot chili sauce are shown on December 12, 2013 in Chicago, Illinois. Huy Fong Foods, the maker of Sriracha, says it can’t ship any more of its sauce until next month because in California, where the sauce is produced, the Department of Public Health is now enforcing stricter guidelines that require sauces be held for 35 days before they are shipped. (Photo Illustration by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • Alcohol

    Lonely sad woman drinking red wine at home. Depression and sadness concept. Alcohol abuse social problem.

  • Fried and Fatty Foods

    Fried Food

    TEL AVIV, ISRAEL – FEBRUARY 17: An employee serves a portion of Kentucky Fried Chicken and chips at the international chain’s local franchise February 17, 2006 in Tel Aviv, Israel. Officials are trying to reassure consumers that it is safe to eat well cooked poultry following the discovery of the deadly H5N1 strain of bird flu in swans in Europe. According to the Times newspaper of London, viruses are reportedly destroyed by cooking for at least one minute at 75C (167F) or higher. (Photo by David Silverman/Getty Images)

  • Acidic Foods

    Acidic

    MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – APRIL 08: In this photo illustration, products containing high sugar levels are on display at a supermarket on April 8, 2016 in Melbourne , Australia. The World Health Organisation’s first global report on diabetes found that 422 million adults live with diabetes, mainly in developing countries. Australian diabetes experts are urging the Federal Government to consider imposing a sugar tax to tackle the growing problem. (Photo by Luis Ascui/Getty Images)

  • Carbonated and Caffeinated Drinks

    Soda

    SAN FRANCISCO, CA – JULY 22: Bottles of Fanta are displayed in a food truck’s cooler on July 22, 2014 in San Francisco, California. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors will vote on Tuesday to place a measure on the November ballot for a 2-cents-per-ounce soda tax. If the measure passes in the November election, tax proceeds would help finance nutrition, health, disease prevention and recreation programs. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

  • Big Meals

    Thanksgiving Meal

  • Instead of Those, Try These

  • Bananas

    bananas

    Just like those starches, bananas are easy on your stomach. Plus, they contain potassium, which is a key component in regulating your body’s fluid balance.

  • Chickpeas/Hummus

    Chickpeas

    NEW YORK, NY – NOVEMBER 05: A view of hummus and ingredients in the kitchen at the Holiday Appetizer class during the Food Network Magazine Cooking School 2016 at The International Culinary Center on November 5, 2016 in New York City. (Photo by Matthew Eisman/Getty Images for Food Network Magazine)

  • Nuts and Seeds

    Mixed Nuts

    Nuts

  • Dark Chocolate

    French chocolates

    Photo by Francois G. Durand/Getty Images