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LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - FEBRUARY 04: Tiffany Haddish attends the Stand UP: The Art And Politics Of Comedy Opens The City Of Los Angeles' Black History Month Celebration at Los Angeles City Hall on February 04, 2020 in Los Angeles, California.

Actress and comedienne Tiffany Haddish recently got emotional during an interview while recalling her mother’s abuse.

“My momma, she used to knock me out. Straight punch me, hit me, because she couldn’t use her words,” Haddish explained during the interview. Her mother was involved in a car crash that left her with severe brain damage.

“Here she is from a woman who owns two properties, owns her own business, was the manager at the US Post Office has a very extensive vernacular and now she had to learn how to walk talk eat everything that she taught me at that point I’m teaching her.”

“And the frustration of that she couldn’t think of the words so she would just hit. And so I thought maybe if I did a dance for her then maybe she won’t punch me in my nose today,” Tiffany Haddish continued, referencing her mother’s experience after a bad car accident that damaged her mentally.

BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA – JANUARY 05: Tiffany Haddish attends the 77th Annual Golden Globe Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on January 05, 2020 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Jon Kopaloff/Getty Images)

Tiffany Haddish also discussed her experience in foster care during the interview.“At 12, 13 we got put in foster care. Got split up. My two sisters were put together. My two brothers were put together and then I was by myself for a few days,” Haddish said.

“Then I moved to a foster home, then a couple of other places then finally my grandma got custody of all of us.” Haddish also shared how a lot of men in the industry wanted her to have sex with them to get her foot into the door.

“A whole lot of not giving up no [expletive] so that you get held back. It’s a lot of men out here mad at me right now,” Haddish said. “Its a lot of dudes that used to tell me unless you [expletive] me you not gonna get here unless you’re my girl. It’s me that’s gonna walk you through the door. And I’m like, ‘No it’s God walking me in the door. You don’t walk me in no door.’”

Glennisha Morgan is a Detroit-bred multimedia journalist and writer. She writes about intersectionality, hip-hop, pop culture, queer issues, race, feminism, and her truth. Follow her on Twitter @GlennishaMorgan.