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The MRL Morning Show

Weekdays 6:00AM-10:00AM

Hurricane Florence caused heavy flooding and wind damage in the Carolinas, which means as it heads out of the Carolinas residents will start the rebuilding process. Several people have asked how they can start helping…here’s how.

The MRL Morning Show is going to team up with other Beasley Media Group stations and do a relief effort for those affected all over North and South Carolina. While that will happen, there are ways you can start helping right now.

According to the Center for International Disaster Information, which is part of the United States Agency for International Development, sending money is always the most efficient way to help in a disaster. It’s important to do your research on what foundation you donate to. There are websites where you can check the credibility based on transparency and financial health.

Charity Navigator 

GuideStar

Wise Giving Alliance

Charity Watch

While there will be plenty of national relief efforts underway to help our coast, there are several Carolina-based relief efforts that can keep you close to home. Michael Jordan, the owner of the Charlotte Hornets, grew up in Wilmington, NC and has put together a microsite to direct donations to reputable organizations. You can check that out here.

Another Carolina-based relief effort is The Diaper Bank of North Carolina, which is based in Durham. They are collecting donations for diapers and feminine hygiene products to give to people who are displaced by the storm. The organization is also seeking volunteers.

Governor Roy Cooper announced that the state itself will be accepting donations and you can contribute online or by texting FLORENCE to 20222.

Taking it to South Carolina, the state is soliciting donations for the One SC Fund, which supports nonprofits that help state residents recover from natural disasters, like Hurricane Florence.

Don’t forget about the animals.

After natural disasters like Hurricane Florence, so many animals are affected. Before Florence hit land, many local animal shelters scrambled to transport their animals to safe locations or to get them adopted. The Atlanta Humane Society cared for dozens of animals from Beaufort, South Carolina. After Hurricane Irma hit last year, the organization put up 1,000 animals in an emergency shelter and a spokeswoman has said if needed it can do it again after Florence. This protects animals in case shelters are damaged, and also frees up space for lost or displaced animals that are guaranteed to come in after the storm passes.

The Charleston Animal Societ, American Humane and the Humane Society of the United States are organizations running similar donation drives.

Shelters are also encouraging people outside the storm-affected areas to foster or adopt. Many shelters are waiving or discounting fees.

Be on the lookout for MRL’s announcement for what them and Beasley Media Group will be doing personally to help our coast.